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2016-05-09 Today’s photo. More at www.okb.se and www.facebook.com/okbfoto and www.instagram.com/kristianberlin
 
The central station in Gothenburg is Sweden’s largest “terminus” (“säckstation” in Swedish) meaning that trains arriving here have to go back the same way they came in.

2016-05-08 I saw the sign

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2016-05-08 Today’s photo. More at www.okb.se and www.facebook.com/okbfoto and www.instagram.com/kristianberlin
 
One of the things I like about Helsingborg is the many small signs by buildings and and places telling a bit about the history of it. Here’s the sign outside Gamlegård. For those of you that don’t read Swedish, this is a nice exercise.

2016-05-05 Coat of arms of Sweden

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2016-05-05 Today’s photo. More at www.okb.se andwww.facebook.com/okbfoto and www.instagram.com/kristianberlin

The coat of arms of Sweden. Well maybe of the kingdom of Sweden, but since I’m all for changing Sweden from a monarchy to a republic… well yeah.

Anyways, this is at the Gothenburg Central Station. A sign that many commuters perhaps doesn’t take notice of. But, since I’m staying at the hotel on top of the station, I got the chance to take a photo of it from higher up.

2016-05-04 Depth of Field

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2016-05-04 Today’s photo. More at www.okb.se and www.facebook.com/okbfoto and www.instagram.com/kristianberlin
 
From the Wikipedia article about depth of field: “is the distance between the nearest and farthest objects in a scene that appear acceptably sharp in an image”.
 
A common way to demonstrate this is to take a photo of a piece on a chess board.
 
The dust on the chess board demonstrates how seldom I play chess.

2016-05-01 Raspberry Pi

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2016-05-01 Today’s photo. More at www.okb.se and www.facebook.com/okbfoto and www.instagram.com/kristianberlin
 
A macro closeup of a Raspberry Pi B, first generation.
 
The company I work for (Beckhoff Automation), is celebrating that it’s been doing PC-based machine controls for 30 years this year. So, last week I saw a comparison on how much faster and more capable today’s systems are compared to the ones 30 years ago.
 
Almost 30 years ago, the computer we had was a Commodore 64. It had a MOS Technology 6510 CPU and 64 kB of RAM. The current version of Raspberry Pi has a 1200 MHz, quad-core CPU and 1 GB of RAM. According to Wikipedia the Commodore 64 had an introductory price of US$595 (in 1983). The Raspberry Pi 3 is sold for US$35.
 
By the way, check my photo from March 13.